Abandoned Car of the Week

A Texas Ford pickup



The first-generation Ford F Series pickup was introduced in 1948, and was built in eight different weight ratings and several different styles from 1948-1952. This 1951 sample was discovered by Peter Hubbard near Harker Heights, Texas.
(Photo by Peter Hubbard)

Plymouth wore new design in 1953



Plymouth marked its 25th anniversary in 1953, the same year it introduced a new design for its mainstream car. Unfortunately, the only engine available with the new design was the company's 20-year-old flathead six-cylinder. It also soldiered on without an automatic transmission, the only mainstream car not to offer one that year. Even so, Plymouth turned in a record sales year. This used up 1953 Plymouth was discovered in Mayer, Ariz.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)

A North Dakota Mercury



Mercury refreshed its pre-war 1941 model — which was all new at the time — with a new grille and other styling tweaks for the first post-war cars built for model years 1946-48. This post-war coupe was discovered behind a barn in Ellendale, North Dakota.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

Ford Model A still lives



The Ford Model A, successor to the historically successful Model T, was built for only four model years (1928-31), but sold nearly 5 million units in that short time. One copy still barely surviving was discovered by Peter Hubbard for his Junkyard Dog collection.

A Missouri Falcon



The compact Ford Falcon featured a more squared-off look for 1964, the first year of its second-generation. The '64 Falcon came in eight body styles and with five engine offerings (three inline 6-cylinder models and two V-8s). Transmissions included a two- and three-speed automatic and a three- and -four-speed manual. This abandoned copy was found in Rolla, Mo.
(Photo By Jim Meachen)

Big Dodge in retirement



The Dodge Monaco started life as a full-sized line in 1965 based on the outgoing Dodge Custom 880 competing with the Ford LTD, Chevrolet Impala and the Plymouth Fury. This 1966 sedan was discovered in retirement in eastern North Carolina. In addition to a sedan, it came hardtop coupe, station wagon, and a hardtop (pillorless) sedan. Available engines were a 6.2-liter and 7.2-liter V-8s.
(Photo by Ralph Gable)

Rambler American in Arizona



The year 1964 marked the beginning of the third generation Rambler American by American Motors. It was built through 1969 with five body styles including convertible, 2-door hardtop and coupe, 4-door sedan and 4-door station wagon. Three inline 6-cylinder engines (base engine 90 hp) and four V-8s were offered. Transmissions included 3 and 4-speed manuals and a 3-speed automatic. This Rambler convertible was found in Mayer, Ariz.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)
 

Edsel in junkyard retirement


This 1958 Edsel is part of Peter Hubbard's Junkyard Dog collection, discovered in a junkyard that includes a large number of decaying models from the 1950s and 1960s. The Edsel was conceived as a model to bridge the gap between Ford and the more upscale Mercury-Lincoln brands. But it bombed out, surviving for only three model years. (Photo by Peter Hubbard)

Arizona Ford truck



This rusted-out 1940 Ford work truck was discovered at the Wigwam Motel along old Route 66 in Holbrook, Ariz. (Photo by Ted Biederman)

Junk truck



The second-generation Chevrolet C/K pickup was built from 1967-1972. The 1971 model was given several styling updates including a new "egg crate" grille design. This 1971 C/K found in North Carolina appears to be a receptacle for junk. One of the '71 updates was the inclusion for the first time of an AM/FM radio.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)