Abandoned Car of the Week

A Dodge SUV forerunner



The Dodge Town Wagon and Panel was built between 1954 and 1966 presumably to give the popular Chevrolet Suburban competition. It could be purchased with windows in a passenger configuration or strictly as a panel van. The Dodge Wagon, a forerunner of the modern sport utility vehicle, could be purchased with four-wheel drive. This circa 1960-65 Town Wagon was discovered in New Mexico.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)

Mid-size Cutlass in retirement



The Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera is a mid-size car manufactured and marketed for model years 1982-1996. It shared the front-wheel drive A platform with the similar Buick Century, Pontiac 6000 and Chevrolet Celebrity. The Cutlass Ciera shared the Cutlass nameplate with the smaller Cutlass Calais and the larger Cutlass Supreme. This late 1980s copy was found abandoned in eastern North Carolina.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

Texaco gas hauler of the '40s



This 1941 Chevrolet AK Series truck hauled Texaco gas in Texas during the 1940s. Chevrolet introduced the new and rather unique truck design in 1941.  It was replaced by the Advance Design truck in 1947, introduced as the company's first new truck after WWII. The AK had a "modern front end design" with horizontal bevelled grille bars in the upper section, vertical bars below, and headlamps sunk partly into the front fenders. Peter Hubbard found the truck in Liano, Texas, for his Junkyard Dog collection.
(Photo by Peter Hubbard)

Passenger-hauling days over for this Flxible bus



This Flxible Visicoach passenger bus was found languishing in an Arizona salvage yard. Flexible manufactured coaches and transit buses from 1913 through its closing in 1996. Flxible built 925 copies of the Visicoach — an update of its clipper-style buses from the '30s and '40s — from 1950 through 1956.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)


B-Series Dodge pickup in retirement



Dodge built the B-series pickup truck from 1948-53, and you can distinguish the 1951 through1953 models by their "Job Rated" badge on the grille. The 1953 model was the first to get a fully automatic transmission, dubbed the Truck-O-Matic. Dodge started selling "Job Rated" trucks in 1939, aimed at getting the customer the truck that fit the job for which it was purchased. The Job Rated designation carried through to the mid-50s when it was dropped. This circa 1951-53. Dodge pickup was discovered in a field in eastern North Carolina.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

Once a hauler of gas



GMC streamlined its truck design in 1939 and reconfigured its 6-cylinder engines. This 1939 medium duty GMC truck hauled Sinclair gas through the 1940s near Paris Springs Junction, Mo. It's now an attraction for sightseers along old Route 66 in southwestern Missouri. (Photo by Jim Meachen)

The remains of a muscle car



This 1969 Pontiac GTO was found in eastern North Carolina in a state of disrepair. The GTO was built from 1964 through 1974 and helped cement the muscle car generation with a variety of high-horsepower V-8 engines. The second-generation began in 1968 with a slightly fastback design. The door vent windows were eliminated in 1969 helping differentiate the 1968 from the '69. There were 72,287 GTOs built for the '69 model year.
(Photos by Jim Meachen)

Late '40s International pickup



This circa 1947-1949 International pickup was found in an abandoned, but restorable state by Jim Prueter. Following World War II International truck production began with a slightly new design in 1947 highlighted by the barrel-shaped grille sprouting little "wings." The emblem on the side shows that this truck was a heavy duty KB-3 model. In that three-year period International produced 122,000 KB designated trucks.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)

A small Buick from the 1980s



The fourth generation of the Buick Skylark was a compact sedan and coupe based on General Motors' X-body architecture shared with the Chevrolet Citation, Pontiac Phoenix and Oldsmobile Omega. The Skylark came with three engine options — a 2.5 four-cylinder, and two versions of a 2.8-liter V-6. They were mated to a three-speed automatic and a four-speed manual. This 1984 Skyark was found in eastern North Carolina.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

1956 Ford station wagon



Station wagons were popular in the 1950s and Ford built six trim levels for 1956 from the base Custom Ranch Wagon through the luxurious Country Squire. This mid-trim level 1956 Country Sedan found in Rolla, Mo., could be purchased in an eight-passenger configuration. Like modern crossovers, rear seats could be folded down for cargo storage. The top engine for 1956 was the 292 cubic inch, 202-horsepower Thunderbird Y-8, which, Ford pointed out, used regular gas.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)