Abandoned Car of the Week

The remains of a pre-war Dodge



Dodge pickups underwent a complete redesign with streamlined styling in 1939. One of those styling features was a very attractive front end, which is one of the few things that has survived this 1941 Dodge. The 1941 truck came with a 218 cubic inch six-cylinder engine making 75 horsepower.
(Photo by Peter Hubbard)

1939 Chevy lives in Iowa



This neglected 1939 Chevrolet was found in Perry, Iowa, in what appears to be restorable condition. Chevrolet had a good pre-war sales year of 577,278 units.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)

Jeep welcomes travelers to Arizona



This post-World War II Willys Jeep station wagon was discovered along Route 66 at the Arizona-New Mexico border. The wagon was produced by Willys in the United States from 1946 to 1965. Production continued in Argentina until 1981. Four-wheel drive did not become an option on the wagon until 1949. (Photo by Jim Meachen)

Life passes by this MG Midget



The MG Midget two-seat sports car was built from 1961 to 1979. This third-generation circa 1972-74 model was found living by the side of a road in eastern North Carolina. It is powered by a 55 horsepower 4-cylinder engine making 67 pound-feet of torque. The third of four generations went from 1966 through 1974. (Photo by Jim Meachen)

An Arizona Chevrolet tow truck


This very interesting looking Chevrolet tow truck was discovered in Mayer, Ariz., by Jim Prueter. We seldom come up empty handed when doing research to identify vehicles, but this one has us stumped. It looks a lot like an early '60s Corvair truck, but the front end does not match up with the Corvair. Only certainty — it's from the early '60s and it probably hauled a few broken down cars in its day. (Photo by Jim Prueter)

Florida tow truck lives on as advertising sign



This 1939 Chevrolet tow truck was found living in abandoned retirement as an advertising sign for a body shop in Starke, Fla. The 1939 was one of the last model years Chevy trucks and medium-duty vehicles shared an appearance with Chevrolet passenger coupes and sedans. (Photo by Ralph Gable)

First of the Chevy C/K pickups

Chevrolet's 1960-61 pickups wore a distinctive front end design with two large ovals enclosing the parking lights high atop the hood. The 1960 truck wore a new C/K designation — the C indicated two-wheel drive and the K indicated four-wheel drive.  Chevy used that name until 1999 when it was changed to Silverado. The first generation of the C/K truck ran from 1960 through 1966 with a new drop-center ladder frame allowing the cab to sit lower. This 1960 pickup was discovered in an Illinois salvage yard by Peter Hubbard.

A Renault Dauphine survivor



The small French Renault Dauphine sedan sold more than 2 million units during its wordwide run from 1956 through 1967. The Dauphine measured 155 inches in length with a 89.3-inch wheelbase, came with a 51.6-cubic-inch rear-mounted four-cylinder engine with two versions, 27 and 36 horsepower. Zero to 60 time with the larger engine was measured at 30 seconds. Road and Track tested the bigger engine doing 0-to-68 in 32 seconds. Dauphine ads proclaimed 35-to-40 miles per gallon. This circa 1960s model was discovered along Route 66 in Carterville, Mo.
(Photo by Ted Biederman)

Lincoln Town Car lives in the weeds



The Lincoln Town Car is a model line of full-size luxury sedans that was marketed by the Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company in three generations from 1981 to 2011. This first-generation (1981-1989) Town Car was found in an abandoned condition in eastern North Carolina. The Town Car shared its chassis and mechanical components with the Mercury Grand Marquis and the Ford (LTD) Crown Victoria.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

Route 66 Chevrolet in good shape



The addition of the Powerglide automatic transmission gave Chevrolet an edge on Ford in 1950. It was a $159 option. A slightly larger version of the long-running "stovebolt" six-cylinder engine came with the new transmission to make up for power loss from the automatic shifter. This 1950 Chevy was found in Rolla, Mo., along Route 66. (Photo by Jim Meachen)