Abandoned Cars III

See the latest abandoned cars at Abandoned Cars I

The fifth generation Ford Ranchero was built from 1972-1976, but the 1972 is a distinct — at least from the front — one-year model because the front of the 1973 was changed to meet federal crash-test standards. There were four engine choices including three V-8s in 1972. This "retired" copy was found in South Carolina. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


This 1954 Chevrolet 4-door station wagon was discovered in New Mexico. 1954 was the last model year on the platform introduced in 1950 before big changes that were to come in 1955. Available engines were a 3.5-liter (215 cubic inch) inline 6 making 92 horsepower and a 3.9-liter (235 cubic inch) inline 6 making 106 horsepower. Transmission choices were a 3-speed manual or a 2-speed powerglide automatic. Of the 1,150,816 Chevrolets produced in 1954, 56,735 or about 5 percent were wagons. (Photos by Jim Prueter)


This 1964 second-generation (1960-1965) Ford Falcon Ranchero was discovered in Texas in what looks like restorable condition. The Ranchero was produced by Ford from 1957 through 1979 on various platforms including full-sized, compact and intermediate. The Ranchero was adapted from a two-door station wagon platform that integrated the cab and cargo bed into the body. A total of 508,355 units were produced during the model's production run. The second generation trucks came with a variety of engine sizes, the smallest being a 2.4-liter inline 6 making 90 horsepower. If performance was needed, there was a 4.7-liter V-8 available. (Photo by Peter Hubbard)




This circa 1962-65 Chevy II Nova wagon is obviously no longer in service as a business vehicle. It was found in retirement along U.S. 301 in eastern North Carolina.  After the rear-engine Chevrolet Corvair was outsold by the conventional Ford Falcon in 1960, Chevrolet began work on a more conventional compact car that would eventually become the Chevy II.  In its first generation, five engine options were offered — a 4-cylinder, two inline 6 cylinders, and two V-8s. Transmission offerings included either a 3-speed or 4-speed manual, and a two-speed automatic. (Photos by Jim Meachen)



This idyllic scene that includes a rather used up 1960s era pickup truck was captured in Chicken, Alaska. Technically, the pickup is probably not abandoned, but still used for chores. However, we think it would look right at home in a field of abandoned vehicles. (Photo by Jerry Brown)


The fourth generation of the Buick Skylark was a compact sedan and coupe based on General Motors' X-body architecture shared with the Chevrolet Citation, Pontiac Phoenix and Oldsmobile Omega. The Skylark came with three engine options — a 2.5 four-cylinder, and two versions of a 2.8-liter V-6. They were mated to a three-speed automatic and a four-speed manual. This 1984 Skyark was found in eastern North Carolina. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


This 1951 Ford F-1 pickup was photographed near Atlanta, Texas, now serving as an outdoor planter. The first generation of the Ford F-Series pickup truck was built from 1948 through 1952. The standard pickup came in three formats including the F-1 (1/2 ton), the F-2 (3/4 ton) and F-3 Heavy Duty. The front end was redesigned for 1951 with a single-bar-type grille with a headlight at each end of the grille bar. (Photo by Peter Hubbard)


This retired copy of an Allis Chalmers Model B tractor was found in a barn in eastern North Carolina. The Model B — built between 1937 and 1957 — was one of the company's most popular and versatile tractors. Over the years the Model B came in several variations, powered by a 4-cylinder gas engine. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


This 1958 Studebaker President sedan was found stored away behind a building in North Carolina. The President nameplate was revived in 1955 and built through 1958. It came in both two-door and four-door styles. The Studebaker brand ended with 1964 models and its South Bend plant was closed near the end of 1963.  (Photo by Ralph Gable)


This 1940 Buick was found in a junk yard in Maricopa, Ariz. Buick was the fourth best-selling nameplate in the country in the years leading up to World War II. Buick trailed only Chevrolet, Ford and Plymouth in sales with 278,784 in 1940 and 374,196 in 1941. 1941 was Buick's largest sales year in history. (Photos by Jim Prueter)


This example of Studebaker’s 1941-48 M-series truck was discovered along old Route 66 in Santa Rosa, N.M.  One of the company's most successful line of trucks, it could be purchased i n 1/2 ton, 3/4 ton and 1 1/2 ton and 2 ton versions.  First produced in November 1940, it saw extensive action during WW II. It sported a more aerodynamic shape than most trucks of the time. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


This 1960 Ford Thunderbird was spotted in Texas Hill Country, although we don't know if the well-used, but still restorable  T-Bird was actually sold. Ford began building four-passenger Birds in 1958 after they started life three years earlier as a two-seat sports car. The 1960 model can be differentiated from the rear by its three taillights on each side. The 1958 and 1959 models had two. (Photo by Peter Hubbard)


The original F-Series Ford pickup was built from 1948 through 1952. A well-preserved copy was spotted doing service as yard art at a home near Seattle, Wash. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


After starting life as two-seat sports car in 1955, the Ford Thunderbird was turned it into a four-place "personal luxury car" for the 1958 model year. It was a sales success in the first years of its transformation. This rather beaten up 1959 model was discovered in retirement in a Texas field. (Photo by Peter Hubbard)


This late-1940s Ford F-Series pickup is serving its retirement years as a roadside sign along old Route 66 in Oklahoma. The first F-Series was introduced in late 1947 as a 1948 model replacing the pre-WW II designed trucks. The first generation was built through 1952 and good be purchased wth an inline 6-cylinder engine, a Flathead V-8, or a Y-block V-8. (Photo by Jim Meachen)



Two 1958 Chevrolet sedans sit in the snow in a Cortez, Col., salvage yard. Photographer Peter Hubbard waded through the white stuff to get pictures of abandoned and decaying cars at the Colorado site. The 1958 Chevrolet styling exchanged the 1957 bumper and grille combination for a somewhat more conventional assembly. The new cars also got quad headlights. 1958 was the 50th anniversary of the brand. (Photo by Peter Hubbard)


This post-WWII Chevrolet pickup from the late 1940s watches traffic by the side of a South Carolina road in an abandoned state of disrepair. Chevrolet began manufacturing its so-called "Advance Design" pickup truck in 1947. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


A 1958 or '59 Ford Thunderbird sits front and center in this snow-covered salvage yard in Cortez, Col., perhaps enjoying a white Christmas. A 1958 Chevrolet and a couple of Chrysler products are directly behind. (Photo by Peter Hubbard)


Chevrolet built the astounding number of 624,489 sedans for the 1956 model year. This is one of the survivors from more than 60 years ago found behind a garage in North Carolina. Prices ranged from $1,869 for a base One-Fifty to $2,230 for a top line Bel Air four-door hardtop. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


This 1929 or '30 Pierce-Arrow was discovered parked in front of an old Phillips 66 gas station on Route 66 in Chandler, Okla. The Pierce Arrow was redesigned in 1929 to include headlights molded into the front fenders. It came in four wheelbases with a choice of three straight eight engines with horsepower ratings from 115 to 132. Prices ranged from $2,595 to $6,250, a princely sum during the first years of the Great Depression. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


The "Advance Design" Chevrolet trucks entered the scene in June1947, and exterior styling remained virtually the same through 1953. The first major change was with the grille treatment in 1954. This copy of the time period was found in relatively good condition in retirement behind a garage in southeastern North Dakota. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


This neglected 1939 Chevrolet was found in Perry, Iowa, in what appears to be restorable condition. Chevrolet had a good pre-war sales year in 1939 of 577,278 units. (Photo by Jim Prueter)


The MG Midget two-seat sports car was built from 1961 to 1979. This third-generation circa 1972-74 model was found living by the side of a road in eastern North Carolina. It is powered by a 55 horsepower 4-cylinder engine making 67 pound-feet of torque. The third of four generations went from 1966 through 1974. (Photos by Jim Meachen)




This 1939 Chevrolet tow truck was found living in abandoned retirement as an advertising sign for a body shop in Starke, Fla. The 1939 was one of the last model years Chevy trucks and medium-duty vehicles shared an appearance with Chevrolet passenger coupes and sedans. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


Chevrolet's 1960-61 pickups wore a distinctive front end design with two large ovals enclosing the parking lights high atop the hood. The 1960 truck wore a new C/K designation — the C indicated two-wheel drive and the K indicated four-wheel drive.  Chevy used that name until 1999 when it was changed to Silverado. The first generation of the C/K truck ran from 1960 through 1966 with a new drop-center ladder frame allowing the cab to sit lower. This 1960 pickup was discovered in an Illinois salvage yard by Peter Hubbard.


The Lincoln Town Car is a model line of full-size luxury sedans that was marketed by the Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company in three generations from 1981 to 2011. This first-generation (1981-1989) Town Car was found in an abandoned condition in eastern North Carolina. The Town Car shared its chassis and mechanical components with the Mercury Grand Marquis and the Ford (LTD) Crown Victoria. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


Mercury refreshed its pre-war 1941 model — which was all new at the time — with a new grille and other styling tweaks for the first post-war cars built for model years 1946-48. This post-war coupe was discovered behind a barn in Ellendale, North Dakota. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


The compact Ford Falcon featured a more squared-off look for 1964, the first year of its second-generation. The '64 Falcon came in eight body styles and with five engine offerings (three inline 6-cylinder models and two V-8s). Transmissions included a two- and three-speed automatic and a three- and -four-speed manual. This abandoned copy was found in Rolla, Mo. (Photos By Jim Meachen)


This 1966 Ford Mustang resides on the side of a South Carolina road hoping someone will come along and give it the restoration it deserves. While the exterior seems to be in good condition, it will take some work and greenbacks to bring the interior back up to acceptable standards. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


This 1963½ Ford Galaxie was spotted in Newberg, Ore. It was the industry's first official "½ year" model and was called the "sports hardtop" or "fastback." Galaxie buyers showed their preference as the new sports hardtop models handily outsold the "boxtop" square-roof models. (Photo by Jim Prueter)


This rusted-out 1940 Ford work truck was discovered at the Wigwam Motel along old Route 66 in Holbrook, Ariz. (Photos by Ted Biederman)


The Ford Galaxie was a full sized sedan built from 1959 through 1974. The third generation ran from 1965 through 1968 with the 1968 model getting a new grille and headlights arranged horizontally. This rusted 1968 model — in otherwise good condition — was found in retirement in South Carolina. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


This early 1980s Jeep Wagoneer lives in retirement in the weeds. The Wagoneer was built from 1963 through 1991, a sport utility vehicle (SUV) before the term was even coined. The wagon received only minor styling changes through the years. The Wagoneer was moved upmarket in its later years by AMC before Chrysler acquired AMC in 1987. The Wagoneer could be purchased with either a six-cylinder or V-8 engine in the early '80s and with a four-speed automatic transmission. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


The most interesting aspect of the 1959 Chevrolet was its "bat wing" fins, which took the popular late-50s tail fin design in a slightly new direction. This copy is slowly rusting away in a western North Carolina yard. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


This old bus has eluded the scrap yard by hiding in overgrown bushes and a couple of trees felled by storms over the years in eastern North Carolina. We were not able to determine the vintage of the destroyed people hauler — perhaps a school bus — but we do know it has come to an inglorious end. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


 

This 1960 Buick has been put out to pasture in eastern North Carolina  (Jim Meachen)




These Ford vehicles were found in retirement in eastern North Carolina. At right, a 1961-63 era Thunderbird rests next to a mid-60s era Ford pickup. (Photo by Ralph Gable)