Abandoned Cars II

Click here for the latest additions to Abandoned Cars at Abandoned Cars I
Click here for more abandoned cars at Abandoned Cars III

This second-generation 1966 or 1967 Oldsmobile Cutlass has seen better days. The Cutlass was built from 1961 through 1988 going through five iterations and a couple of sizes. The second generation had four engines available ranging from a 155-horsepower six-cylinder to a 345-horsepower V-8. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


This 1954 Buick Roadmaster (notice the four-porthole design) has not only suffered the indignity of losing its grille and engine, but whoever was last into the car ingloriously left the hood gapping open. The Roadmaster was longer than other models and got a 200-horsepower V-8 engine. Above, an advertisement for the 1954 Roadmaster. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


This 1984 Mercedes-Benz 280 E sedan was found in a deteriorating condition in a wooded area of South Carolina. In the 1980's the E denoted fuel injection. The actual E-Class model as sold today didn't come on line until 1993. (Photos By Ralph Gable)


Plymouth started life in 1928 and by the early 1930s the brand was the third best-selling car in the U.S. By 1939, Plymouth was selling more than 400,000 copies a year. Its best years were 1940-41 when it became the second best-seller, almost catching Ford. This model, which we have identified as a 1936-1938 was discovered by photographer Ralph Gable. Above, a 1937 newspaper advertisement.


In 1981 Isuzu began selling consumer and commercial vehicles under its own brand in the United States after marketing several rebadged General Motors vehicles. GM had bought a 34 percent stake in the Japanese company in 1972.  The Isuzu P'Up was the first model sold to consumers as an Isuzu, rather than as a Chevrolet or Buick. This early '80s P'Up was discovered rusting away in South Carolina. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


This late 1940s passenger bus was found in retirement on old Route 66 in Galena, Kan. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


The Ford Bronco sport utility vehicle hit the market in 1966 and was built mostly unchanged through 1977. The original Bronco, labeled an ORV (Off-Road Vehicle), was designed to compete against the Jeep CJ. The initial engine was a 2.8-liter straight six. Five generations of the Bronco were built through the 1996 model year. This early Bronco has been stripped of most of its equipment inside and out. But the body appears in relatively good shape. (Photos by Jim Meachen)


The 1949-1951 Mercury became popular in the latter part of the 20th Century for conversion to street rods. The Mercury's of that era were propelled by a Ford flathead V-8. This four-door version of either a 1950 or 1951 model was found in South Carolina. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


This 1950s era Chevrolet pickup was spotted in South Carolina perhaps awaiting a good home and a new life. The so-called Advanced Design trucks were the best selling pickups after World War II. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


Based on a quick read of the internet, a 1941 Ford convertible in restored condition can bring as much as $35,000 — and beyond. And some people are even attempting to sell body shells for close to five figures. So this stripped out and worn out copy of a pre-war convertible discovered by photographer Ralph Gable may be worth some bucks.


This third-generation (1961-63) Ford Thunderbird was found in an abandoned state in North Carolina. A 6.4-liter 390 cubic inch V-8 mated to a three-speed automatic transmission was the base powertrain. The third generation benefited from product placement on TV, most notably on the popular series "77 Sunset Strip." (Photos by Ralph Gable)




The 1959 Ford was a major refreshening of the Ford generation that started with the 1957 model. It was perhaps Ford's attempt to counteract the soon-to-be-released all-new "bat-fin"1959 Chevrolet. Although conservative in appearance to the new Chevy, the Ford and its top-of-the-line Galaxie — introduced for the first time — proved to be a popular vehicle.  This lower trim version Ford Custom 300 rusts away in a North Carolina salvage yard. (Photo by Ralph Gable)



This 1941 Cadillac was found in South Carolina in what looks like restorable condition. In 1941 Cadillac introduced the optional Hydra-Matic, the first mass-produced fully automatic transmission, offered the previous year on the Oldsmobile. Notice the Flying Lady Goddess ornament that graced the hood of the '41 model. Above a magazine advertisement for the Series 62 1941 Cadillac. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


A two-tone — we are sure the white portion isn't factory spec — fifth-generation Chevrolet Monte Carlo was discovered in a grove of trees in North Carolina. For the 1995 model year, the mid-sized Chevy Lumina was split into two models with the sedan continuing as the Lumina and the coupe reviving the Monte Carlo nameplate. The fifth generation was built through the 1999 model year. Above, an advertisement for the 1995 Monte Carlo. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


Our photographer Ralph Gable spotted this body — that looks to be in restorable condition — of what appears to be a 1941 International pickup. The K Series light-duty pickup was introduced in 1940 with the key styling element being headlights integrated into the fenders.



Is this circa 1950 Ford truck phtographed in eastern North Carolina abandoned?  Looks in good shape, but we'll check back in a few years to get our answer. (Jim Meachen)


This pre-World War II sedan rusts into dust in a rural
North Carolina field 
(Jim Meachen)


This old bus has found a home in an eastern North Carolina field  (Jim Meachen)

A 1960 Ford Falcon Ranchero rusts away in the North Carolina grass. Ford used the Ranchero name from 1957 through 1979 on "coupe utility" vehicles adoped from two-door staton wagons. The Ranchero was moved from the larger standard-sized Ford in 1960 to the new compact Falcon. The 1960 version came with a three-speed manual, a base two-speed automatic or a three-speed Cruise-O-Matic transmission. The 1960 Ranchero was powered by a 2.8-liter straight six making 90 horsepower. (Photos by Jim Meachen)




A vintage 1940s style bus rests in retirement, burdened by what looks like a pickup truck box on its roof. It's interesting how buses of the post-war era were designed with aerodynamic traits. (Photos by Ralph Gable)


The preferred family hauler of the 50s and 60s? The station wagon. This 1958 Chevrolet,
which has been put into "retirement," was one of the most popular wagons.

(Photo by Jerry Brown)



This old bus was at some point converted into a trailer, perhaps for transient workers.
(Jim Meachen)


A 1947 or 1948 Dodge rests in an attractive bed of weeds.
(From the HIAT Blogspot Old Abandoned Cars section)


Remember when gas was a quarter?  Way back in 1919 gas was an expensive-for-the-time quarter a gallon. But even as late as 1960 gas could be found for under 30 cents and we think these gas station signs probably came from the 1960 era. They were found in Georgia.


We don't know the make — the front end is too far gone — but we are sure the working life of this demolished big rig tractor is over. What's left of it has been abandoned in an eastern North Carolina field. (Photo by Jim Meachen)


This 1947 Ford dump truck was found near Port Townsend, Wash. (Photo by Jerry Brown)


This dismembered 50s-era pickup sets next to the chassis of another truck in N.C.
(Jim Meachen)


Douglas A. Kerr captured this "Studebaker car lot" in Weatherford, Texas. Several Stude-
bakers rest with other brands of vehicles. From left, a 1959 Studebaker pickup, a 1977 or 1978  International bus, a 1966 Ford F-100, a 1960 Studebaker Lark, a 1949 Buick, and a 1951 or 1952 Studebaker wrecker.

 


Weeds will soon overtake this 1965 Ford pickup. (Jim Meachen)


The hood of a used-up 1956 Ford school bus has become the resting place for a cat in
northern California.
  (Photo by Jerry Brown)


There may still be some life in this 1966 Chevrolet   (Jim Meachen)


This old camper truck has probably seen its last camp ground. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


A late '60s or early '70s Clark RV has probably seen its last duty as a travel vehicle
and may spend the rest of its life as a modified storage room for business supplies in
Washington state.
(Photo by Jerry Brown)



This old International Loadstar, at rest in eastern N.C. weeds, has probably seen its last days of service  (Jim Meachen)

The remains of a Ford pickup — could be a 1948, 1949 or 1950 — in Rhyolyte, Nev.
(Photo by Jerry Brown)


A late-1940s Chevrolet work truck decays in a field of other used up equipment.
(Photos by Ralph Gable)



A 1978 GMC pickup has become a weedy yard ornament (Jim Meachen)


This circa 1939 Ford or Mercury (difficult to distinguish), minus a roof, was found in the Wisconsin snow 
(Photo by Jerry Brown)


The usefulness of this circa 1990 Chevrolet S10 has long passed (Photo by Ralph Gable)


O.J. Simpson wouldn't get far in this abandoned white Ford Bronco. (Photo by Ralph Gable)


These old buses started life transporting school children, then they were
converted to chruch buses — according to the name on the sides —
before ending their active lives. 
(Jim Meachen)


An International dump truck has become part of the landscape in eastern
North Carolina
  (Jim Meachen)
 


Early-80s model Chevrolet Monte Carlo is burdened with junk 
(Jim Meachen)


This circa 1932 Ford truck was photographed in Maryland
Found at Adventure Rider


A vintage Dodge Power Wagon ambulance rusts away
Photo by Wes Kibble on Off Road Action


Could this dog be guarding his home, a rust-colored VW bus?
From VWVortex


This abandoned Edsel was spotted in a barn near Whitehall, Ind.
(Photo by Jerry Brown)



Ford built the original Cougar on the popular Ford Mustang platform to give the Mercury brand its own pony car. The original 1967 Cougar came only as a two-door hardtop and slotted into the Ford family lineup between the Mustang and the more upscale Ford Thunderbird. The Cougar was named Motor Trend's "Car of the Year" for 1967. This abandoned and neglected model comes without a front wheel, among other things. (Photos by Ralph Gable)



An abandoned car in French ruins


The remains of a car look at home in woods near Greensboro,
N.C., where they have probably resided for many years.

(Photo by Mark Rainey)


The remains of a truck near Salem, Ore.
(Photo by Brian Hughes)


The glory days of this school bus are long past


This rare 1930s Morris Minor convertible was one of a decaying 30-car collection found
in a barnyard in rural Norfolk County in England early in 2009.  Local mechanic Jimmy
Blanche, who died in December 2008, amassed the incredible collection. The automotive
remains were auctioned in April 2009.
(Photo by Dave Selby, London Telegraph)


This hulk has become a desert sculpture. (Photo by Scott Dommin)


Decaying with dignity


Abandoned 1949 Chevrolet pickup in the pine straw


It looks as if this 1954 DeSoto is being swallowed up by the earth in Renton, Wash.
(From Ghost Towns)


A photographer of abandoned cars found this early-70s International

Harvestor Travelall in a Nevada desert



It appears the UK has its share of abandoned cars


A 1950 Ford has become a depository for pine straw


Tough to tell, but probably a late 1940's model Chevrolet Suburban


This abandoned truck blends neatly into the scenic landscape


John Quimby found these junked (abandoned?) Edsels in  Shamrock, Texas


Someone in Montana tries to make a few bucks off his abandoned "fixer upper" in this photo by Paul Borden


MG's rust away behind a barn  (Jim Meachen) 


This Dodge school bus has probably transported its last riders
(Jim Meachen)    


Abandoned or a sign? Or both. (Ted Biederman)                                                                                                  


An abandoned Dodge Brothers flatbed
truck found in northern California
(Ted Biederman)


Henry J's at rest in the snow

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