Abandoned Car of the Week

Florida tow truck lives on as advertising sign



This 1939 Chevrolet tow truck was found living in abandoned retirement as an advertising sign for a body shop in Starke, Fla. The 1939 was one of the last model years Chevy trucks and medium-duty vehicles shared an appearance with Chevrolet passenger coupes and sedans. (Photo by Ralph Gable)

First of the Chevy C/K pickups

Chevrolet's 1960-61 pickups wore a distinctive front end design with two large ovals enclosing the parking lights high atop the hood. The 1960 truck wore a new C/K designation — the C indicated two-wheel drive and the K indicated four-wheel drive.  Chevy used that name until 1999 when it was changed to Silverado. The first generation of the C/K truck ran from 1960 through 1966 with a new drop-center ladder frame allowing the cab to sit lower. This 1960 pickup was discovered in an Illinois salvage yard by Peter Hubbard.

A Renault Dauphine survivor



The small French Renault Dauphine sedan sold more than 2 million units during its wordwide run from 1956 through 1967. The Dauphine measured 155 inches in length with a 89.3-inch wheelbase, came with a 51.6-cubic-inch rear-mounted four-cylinder engine with two versions, 27 and 36 horsepower. Zero to 60 time with the larger engine was measured at 30 seconds. Road and Track tested the bigger engine doing 0-to-68 in 32 seconds. Dauphine ads proclaimed 35-to-40 miles per gallon. This circa 1960s model was discovered along Route 66 in Carterville, Mo.
(Photo by Ted Biederman)

Lincoln Town Car lives in the weeds



The Lincoln Town Car is a model line of full-size luxury sedans that was marketed by the Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company in three generations from 1981 to 2011. This first-generation (1981-1989) Town Car was found in an abandoned condition in eastern North Carolina. The Town Car shared its chassis and mechanical components with the Mercury Grand Marquis and the Ford (LTD) Crown Victoria.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

Route 66 Chevrolet in good shape



The addition of the Powerglide automatic transmission gave Chevrolet an edge on Ford in 1950. It was a $159 option. A slightly larger version of the long-running "stovebolt" six-cylinder engine came with the new transmission to make up for power loss from the automatic shifter. This 1950 Chevy was found in Rolla, Mo., along Route 66. (Photo by Jim Meachen)

A Texas Ford pickup



The first-generation Ford F Series pickup was introduced in 1948, and was built in eight different weight ratings and several different styles from 1948-1952. This 1951 sample was discovered by Peter Hubbard near Harker Heights, Texas.
(Photo by Peter Hubbard)

Plymouth wore new design in 1953



Plymouth marked its 25th anniversary in 1953, the same year it introduced a new design for its mainstream car. Unfortunately, the only engine available with the new design was the company's 20-year-old flathead six-cylinder. It also soldiered on without an automatic transmission, the only mainstream car not to offer one that year. Even so, Plymouth turned in a record sales year. This used up 1953 Plymouth was discovered in Mayer, Ariz.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)

A North Dakota Mercury



Mercury refreshed its pre-war 1941 model — which was all new at the time — with a new grille and other styling tweaks for the first post-war cars built for model years 1946-48. This post-war coupe was discovered behind a barn in Ellendale, North Dakota.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

Ford Model A still lives



The Ford Model A, successor to the historically successful Model T, was built for only four model years (1928-31), but sold nearly 5 million units in that short time. One copy still barely surviving was discovered by Peter Hubbard for his Junkyard Dog collection.

A Missouri Falcon



The compact Ford Falcon featured a more squared-off look for 1964, the first year of its second-generation. The '64 Falcon came in eight body styles and with five engine offerings (three inline 6-cylinder models and two V-8s). Transmissions included a two- and three-speed automatic and a three- and -four-speed manual. This abandoned copy was found in Rolla, Mo.
(Photo By Jim Meachen)