Abandoned Car of the Week

A 1949 Buick Super



This 1949 Buick Super was found ready for transport — perhaps to an automobile restorer — in Pikeville, N.C. The Super was a full-sized Buick on Buick's larger body shared with the Roadmaster. The Super was produced from 1940 through 1958. It could be differentiated by its three VentiPorts. Three engines were available in 1949 — two inline 8 cylinders rated at 248 and 263 cubic inches and a V-8 with 322 cubic inches. All were mated to a 3-speed sliding shift manual Dynaflow automatic.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

1954 — A good year for 'Job Rated' pickups



Dodge started its successful "Job Rated" advertising campaign in the 1940s, and Dodge trucks through the 1950s were "Job Rated." This 1954 Job Rated pickup truck — lacking most of its original paint — was found in a salvage yard in Texas.
(Photo by Peter Hubbard)

Family transportation in 1963



The 1963 Chrysler station wagon is a huge vehicle stretching out nearly 220 inches, only four inches shorter than the 2020 Chevrolet Suburban. It was propelled by a 340-horsepower V8 mated to a three-speed automatic and could break 8 seconds from 0-to-60.  This used up example was found in an Arizona salvage yard.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)

An Isuzu in the wild



In 1981 the Isuzu P'Up was the first Japanese Isuzu sold in the U.S. under its own name. Isuzu sold small pickups in the U.S. starting in 1972, but through General Motors. The Chevrolet LUV was the first. The small P'Up was built through 1988. This example was spotted in North Carolina.
(Photo by Ralph Gable)

Great patina



This late 1940s Chevrolet "Advanced Design" pickup with great patina was found in Texas. It might be a good long-term restoration project.
(Photo by Peter Hubbard)

A 1969 Chevrolet C50



This 1969 Chevrolet C50 farm truck languishes in a field in eastern North Carolina, perhaps awaiting a new owner to put it back into duty. This truck was part part of the second generation of C-series trucks, introduced in 1960.  (Photo by Jim Meachen)

Chevrolet C-50 farm truck



This Chevrolet C50 farm truck languishes in a field in eastern North Carolina, perhaps awaiting a new owner to put it back into duty. This truck was part part of the second generation of C-series trucks, introduced in 1960.  (Photo by Jim Meachen)

A mid-50s Dodge wagon



Dodge was all-new in 1955 with a 120-inch wheelbase and 212.1-inch overall length — huge by today's standards — longer than the 1954 cars. The Dodge shared its basic mechanicals with the DeSoto Custom, but had distinct styling. This style lasted just two years (1955-1956) before being replaced by an all-new 1957 car. This 1956 station wagon was found in Arizona.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)


A pair of International trucks



A 1949 International truck (left) shares time with a 1948 model in a Texas automotive graveyard. International introduced a new generation of trucks in 1949, the first remake since before World War II. The 1949 truck can be determined by its new grille design. (Photo by Peter Hubbard)

An old Dodge in Utah



This used up 1957 Dodge pickup was spotted by the side of the road near Hanksville, Utah. It was the only year that Dodge made this particular front-end design. The '57 Dodge could be purchased with a 230 cubic inch inline six making 120 horsepower or three different V-8 engines ranging in size from 172 horsepower to 204 horsepower. The truck came with either a 2-speed or 3-speed automatic transmission.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)