Abandoned Car of the Week

Chrysler's first Hemi



The 1951 Chrysler was the first to be powered by the Hemi V-8, although it was known as the Fire Power V-8. The 331-cubic-inch engine made 181 horsepower. This abandoned Chrysler, still looking in good form, was found in eastern North Carolina.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

Warning — Read the instructions



Warning and instruction labels dominate the cab of this mid-20th Century wrecker (upper left). It must have been overwhelming for the novice truck driver. We weren't able to identify the make of the truck, found in retirement in eastern North Carolina, but we think it's either a Mack or an International.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

Post-war Ford



An Arizona salvage yard was seeking $3,500 for this 1946 Ford when these pictures were taken. It looks as if it has a lot of useful parts for an automotive restorer. The Ford was totally redesigned for the 1941 model year and was carried over after the conclusion of World War II as a ’46 model, produced through 1948. Ford led all automakers by a wide margin in sales in 1946, outselling Chevrolet, 468,022 to 398,028.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)

Advance-Design Chevrolet



This 1954 Chevrolet pickup was used by a Texaco service station in Utah as shown by the sign on the passenger-side door. 1947 was the first year of an all-new "Advance-Design" pickup, which was built through 1955. Chevy trucks were number one in sales through those years.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)


An idled excavator



Case has made construction equipment since the late 1800s and continues to this day. This Case 880R excavator, built since 1977, may have seen the last of its working life as it sits idled and rusting in an eastern North Carolina field.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)

An Edsel in Utah



Edsel was a failed experiment by Ford Motor Company in the late 1950s. The full-sized sedan was designed to fit into its lineup between Mercury and Lincoln to give Ford a fourth brand to go up against such nameplates as Buick, Oldsmobile, Dodge and DeSoto. But it never caught on with the public, lasting just three years, 1958-1960. This 1959 model was found in retirement in Utah.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)

A Skylark yard ornament



The fifth-generation compact Buick Skylark — built from 1985 through 1991 — came in two-door and four-door configurations. This circa 1989 model found resting in a North Carolina yard (note the wheels have sunk a few inches into the ground) came with a new-for-1989 3.3-liter V6 making 160 horsepower.
(Photo by Jim Meachen)


1936 restorable Oldsmobile



This 1936 Oldsmobile found in eastern North Carolina seems to be in restorable condition. For 1936 the Oldsmobile came with two engine options — the Series F with a straight-6-cylinder and the longer Series L with a straight 8. The Oldsmobile was restyled for 1935-36 and again in 1937.
  (Photo by Jim Meachen)

Old Fords stick together



A 1946 Ford truck shares time in retirement with a 1957 Ford pickup in Utah. Ford redesigned its 1942 trucks, which sold in limited numbers because of the onset of World War II. The 1942 design was carried over into the 1946 model year when sales resumed. Two engines were available — a 90-horsepower inline 6 and a 100-horsepower V-8. Ford completely restyled its pickup for 1957. The '57 came in Styleside and Stepside configurations.
(Photo by Jim Prueter)

DeSoto business coupe



The rusting remains of a 1937 DeSoto business coupe rest peacefully in an eastern North Carolina woods. Notice the portawall, also known as a whitewall insert, falling off the rear tire. 
(Photo by Jim Meachen)