Paul Borden

GMC takes Terrain into second generation with new engine choices

By Paul Borden
MotorwayAmerica.com

(January 19, 2018) Introduced for 2009 as a companion for its bigger brother Acadia crossover, GMC’s Terrain moves into its second generation for 2018 with three new turbo-charged engines, two different 9-speed transmissions, and many design features that take this compact crossover to a new level for sophistication and performance.

Denali trim takes 2018 GMC Canyon to a higher level

By Paul Borden
MotorwayAmerica.com

(January 15, 2018) When I was growing up, pickup trucks were pretty much utilitarian vehicles good for hauling construction supplies and for farm chores, two-passenger conveyances that could squeeze in a third person if they were good friends or the extra person was on the small side. Like a child.

Fiat adds performance model to 500C portfolio with Abarth Cabrio

By Paul Borden
MotorwayAmerica.com

(January 8, 2018) — Fiat returned to the U.S. market with lots of fanfare and a clever advertising campaign about six years ago after an absence of nearly three decades, but I have to wonder just how far entertaining commercials and cutting prices will carry the Italian automaker this go-around.

BMW gives 'M' treatment to vaunted 5-Series with M550i xDrive

By Paul Borden
MotorwayAmerica.com

(December 28, 2017) BMW — which is much easier to remember than“Bayerische Motoren Werke” AG, or in English, “Bavarian Motor Works” — has championed the slogan “The  Ultimate Driving Machine” since the 1970s, and it doesn’t take a long time behind the wheel of just about any of its models to see that that is no idle boast. Though I haven’t had the opportunity to drive every one of its offerings, I have never been disappointed by the performance of any of those I have.

Black Label package ups the luxury level of Lincoln MKZ

By Paul Borden
MotorwayAmerica.com

(December 26, 2017) After going through a mid-cycle refreshing this year, the Lincoln MKZ will remain basically unchanged for the 2018 model year. which means that unless you are fanatical about having the “latest, newest” of everything, you could get into the entry-level luxury market at some savings by going with the 2017 MKZ.

Jaguar introduces limited production Jaguar F-Type 400 Sport

By Paul Borden
MotorwayAmerica.com

(December 12, 2017) A recent study out of a university in the Netherlands proclaims that there is no such thing as love at first sight. What people often call love at first sight really is just a strong physical attraction, more like lust at first sight.

Lincoln brings back Continental, and it's not what you may be expecting

By Paul Borden
MotorwayAmerica.com

(December 2, 2017) Twice since introducing it as a luxury convertible in 1939, Ford has suspended production of the Lincoln Continental for extended periods of its own volition. We’re not counting the hiatus in production from 1942-45 brought on by the U.S. entry into World War II, though the first gap in production came shortly after that.

2017 Volkswagen Passat 1.8T R-Line — A winner in a shrinking segment

By Paul Borden
MotorwayAmerica.com

(November 13, 2017) One can never be sure — there are always grammar nazis around ready to jump on you for the slightest misuse of a term — but I think I have this right. One of the ironies in the automotive world today is that the better manufacturers are making sedans, the fewer the public seems to be interested in buying.

Yes, a muscle car can have four doors

By Paul Borden
MotorwayAmerica.com

(October 31, 2017) Muscle Car aficionados and automotive purists may have been unhappy when Dodge resurrected the Charger as a four-door sedan instead of the two-door coupe from the 1960s and ’70s, but a little over a decade later, it seems to have worked out just fine.

Thinking pink? Volkswagen certainly did with the 2017 Beetle

By Paul Borden
MotorwayAmerica.com

(October 24, 2017)It was a few years ago that I was delivered a New Beetle Convertible for the week and was stumped by what was stuck on the dash. It was a plastic cylindrical tube that seemed to serve no real purpose other than to distract me.

Was it a place to store coins for tolls? No, because it was too thin for anything but a dime, and even back then the toll collectors were demanding more than 10 cents a pop. Not to mention it would be tough to get even a dime out of it, let alone a quarter.